tumble77

(a commonplace book belonging to Jeevs Sinclair)
Aug 18
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Aug 17
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Aug 16
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Aug 15
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Jul 24
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Jul 23
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Spending a certain amount of time alone, the study suggests, can make us less closed off from others and more capable of empathy — in other words, better social animals.
Jul 22
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Spending a certain amount of time alone, the study suggests, can make us less closed off from others and more capable of empathy — in other words, better social animals.
Jul 21
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Teenagers, especially, whose personalities have not yet fully formed, have been shown to benefit from time spent apart from others, in part because it allows for a kind of introspection — and freedom from self-consciousness — that strengthens their sense of identity.
Jul 20
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People tend to engage quite automatically with thinking about the minds of other people,” Burum said in an interview. “We’re multitasking when we’re with other people in a way that we’re not when we just have an experience by ourselves.
Jul 19
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sharing an experience with someone is inherently distracting, because it compels us to expend energy on imagining what the other person is going through and how they’re reacting to it.
Jul 18
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sharing an experience with someone is inherently distracting, because it compels us to expend energy on imagining what the other person is going through and how they’re reacting to it.
Jul 17
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Jul 14
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psychology’s conventional approach to solitude — an “almost exclusive emphasis on loneliness” — represented an artificially narrow view of what being alone was all about.
Jul 13
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psychology’s conventional approach to solitude — an “almost exclusive emphasis on loneliness” — represents an artificially narrow view of what being alone is all about.
Jul 11
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